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Posts tagged "Alimony"

A growing number of women are ordered to pay alimony

Alimony - also referred to as spousal maintenance - can be a major point of contention when a marriage ends in divorce in Colorado. Understanding how state law views these issues is an important factor when the process is moving forward. However, it is also important to keep a close eye on trends as to who pays the alimony and how much it will be. Oftentimes, there has been a perception that the male in the relationship will end up paying the support. In recent years, however, that has changed, and more women are being ordered to pay alimony and other forms of support to their ex-husbands.

What is considered with the length and amount of alimony?

Divorce in Colorado can be a difficult thing to navigate, especially when one member of the marriage worked and the other either did not work or did not earn enough to support him or herself. Once the marriage is over and the couple decides to part ways, it is not unusual for one former spouse to be ordered to pay alimony to the other.

Tax break for those paying spousal support to vanish in 2019

Our discussion of asset division and taxes last week may have raised some additional tax-related questions for our Boulder County readers. Of course, major new tax legislation has gone into effect as of the first of January. One component of that legislation will have a major impact on anyone paying, and even potentially receiving spousal support.

Singer's ex-husband seeks spousal support modification

Readers of our Boulder County Divorce Law Blog are familiar with questions surrounding one spouse's legal obligation to continue to support the other after a divorce. How much spousal support must one pay, and for how long, are important to be aware of during the divorce process. However, even after the separation has been finalized and payments begin, it may be possible to request changes to alimony payments, under certain circumstances.

Requesting a spousal support modification in Colorado

Couples seeking to end their marriage and go their separate ways often have to settle bitter disputes before they can move on. A common one is the amount of spousal support one will have to pay to the other after the divorce. This amount, however, is not set in stone: either spouse can request a modification, or a change in the amount that is paid. Let's take a closer look at what's required in order to request a modification, as it may not be as difficult as some would expect.

Is there an alternative to alimony?

Sometimes the emotional turbulence of divorce coupled with the uncertainty of the future can distract from effective legal negotiation and proper financial planning. One area where this is evident is alimony, also known as spousal support. Most people assume there is no alternative to the traditional monthly-payment alimony structure. A couple getting divorced, however, may request to pay a lump sum rather than make monthly payments. There are advantages to a lump sum approach for both sides.

Will I receive enough alimony to maintain my standard of living?

Although divorce is a legal process it affects more than a person's status as single or married. It may wage an emotional war on their energy and happiness and it may significantly change the way that they look at their assets and money. In Colorado marital couples that choose to divorce must divide up their property, figure out how they will share their children, and in some cases determine if either of them should receive financial support from the other after their divorce is finalized.

Conditions exist for alimony payments to be tax deductible

During a Colorado divorce, a court may order one of the parties to pay the other alimony for the financial maintenance of the recipient. Support of this nature can be a significant expense for the paying party but in some cases, that individual may be able to deduct the payments from their taxable income. Likewise, recipients of alimony generally must report payments as income so that they may pay the taxes on those transfers of money.

Alimony is a legal obligation between ex-spouses

This Boulder County family law blog has addressed a number of topics related to the important and often necessary subject of alimony. Alimony can be ordered by courts so that one spouse may maintain their standard of living in the wake of a divorce that may otherwise deprive them of access to their former spouse's earnings.

Documents you may need if your ex stops paying alimony

Not every divorce will result in an award of alimony. After evaluating the petition of the requesting spouse, a Colorado court may determine if the requesting party will be financially disadvantaged after the marriage is over and if they will need support from their ex in order to maintain their livelihood. While many households now thrive on two incomes and marital parties are on relatively more even financial footing than they historically were, alimony payments are a necessary part of many divorce settlements to ensure that each party can survive on their own.