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High Asset Divorce Archives

Is a spouse is hiding assets during a divorce?

Though divorces are rarely considered easy, some divorces proceed with fewer complications than others. A divorce between individuals who have not had children and who have not comingled their assets may be completed with fewer negotiations and disagreements than one where custody, support, and property division battles are likely to occur between the divorcing parties. The presence of money and significant assets does not necessarily mean that a divorce will be hard, but often, Colorado residents who enjoy lucrative lifestyles may find that there are challenges in identifying and dividing their property.

A separate inheritance may stay separate during divorce

Often, individuals may consider if and how they should pass along gifts of money or property to those loved ones who will outlive them. When a Colorado resident receives money or property during the probate process, it is considered an inheritance. Although particular facts and circumstances may shift an inheritance from the sole property of an individual to the marital property of a couple, inheritances generally are considered separate property when it comes to dividing property during a divorce.

Television star files for divorce from spouse of four years

Keeping a marriage together can take a lot of work and while only the partners to each ending marriage know exactly why their union must dissolve, it is important to remember that a divorce can strike relationships between individuals of all socioeconomic levels. In fact, while money can be a factor that causes stress and concern, some Colorado marriages may be a factor that brings down other committed marital unions.

What property is subject to division during a divorce?

As previously discussed on this divorce and family law blog, Colorado recognizes the common law and equitably divides property between divorcing parties. While a party generally will keep the separate property that they acquire before and during their marriage, they will see their marital property divided in a manner that the courts deem fair and equitable.

Valentine's Day marked by both proposals and divorce filings

Beginning shortly after Thanksgiving, Colorado residents may have noticed an increase in jewelry commercials airing during their favorite primetime shows. Many of those commercials featured happy couples sharing special moments that ended with proposals of marriage and gleeful acceptances capped off with the placing of rings on the women's fingers. The holidays are a popular time for the partners to couples to solidify their commitments to each other and prepare for marriage. Less well known, though, is that the holidays are also a time when many couples choose to end their marriages.

High-profile couple reportedly split, plan amicable divorce

Most folks in Colorado have probably heard horror stories of wealthy couples in divorce court. Recriminations and back-and-forth allegations can abound, and many suspect that each spouse is simply trying to grab as big a slice of the marital property as possible. Recently, however, the marriage of one high-profile couple hit the headlines not for any acrimony involved in their divorce but rather the apparent harmony.

What is not considered marital property in Colorado?

Not too long ago, this blog discussed the property division process in Colorado. It was pointed out that marital property in the Centennial State is subject to equitable division in a divorce. Sharp-eyed readers may have noticed that this suggests there may be property that is not considered marital property. This property is usually called separate property, and in Colorado, it is not subject to equitable division in a divorce.

Understanding how to approach a gray divorce

Divorce can be emotionally and financially challenging. When a divorce occurs later in life, the financial impact can be amplified. Divorcing later in life provides less time to rebuild. A university study found that the rate of divorce for couples over 50 doubled from 1990 to 2010. A quarter of divorces involve someone over the age of 50. Overall, more older adults are experiencing divorce.

Property interests can be contentious for divorcing spouses

Many people in Boulder County have probably heard that the divorce rate has gone up lately among people aged 50 and older. This means that many people who thought that they were well on their way to "happily ever after" either find themselves considering divorce or find themselves served with divorce papers. How did this happen and what does it mean for each person's property interests?