Last week, our blog took a look at the case of a multimillionaire couple involved in contentious, ongoing litigation over the end of their marriage. However, we want to remind our Boulder County readers that these issues can affect anyone, not just celebrities and business tycoons. Any high asset divorce or a normal divorce can quickly become a legal quagmire.

In fact, even a modestly successful business can complicate property division. It is common for entrepreneurs and small business to combine separate personal funds with business assets from time to time as they build their business. But, Colorado divorce law divides marital property equitably between divorcing spouses, and when these assets are comingled, it is often difficult for the courts to decide which property is martial property, which is divided, and non-martial property, which is left with its original owner.

As such, a professional, like Shea L. Burchill, is often needed. These professionals use their experience in this field to accurately and convincingly demonstrate what constitutes marital property versus non-marital property.

It is also common for wealthier couples to own high-value assets, like multiple homes or investment properties, collectible automobiles or artwork, jewelry or antiques. To what extent should these be considered marital property? Were they acquired using joint or separate funds — or perhaps a combination of both? As one can see, these issues can quickly get complicated.

Shea L. Burchill works with clients to develop a clear picture of what is involved in the marital estate early in the process, regardless of whether the divorce is heading for litigation or an out-of-court settlement. She is a passionate and articulate advocate for clients in the courtroom, and she believes in being prepared in advance for the potentially contentious issues that tend to emerge in a high-asset divorce.